Tag Archives: Announcement

New Titles

It’s been awhile, and I apologize. But it seems like everyone here has been felled by the crud that won’t leave, family emergencies and Murphy. You know Murphy. He shows up when you least have time to deal with him and stays much too long. Any way, we’ve kicked Murphy out and are now back to the grindstone. To get things underway for 2012, we’re pleased to offer six new titles.

Boys

by Dave Freer
($0.99)

When she was “convinced” to buy the new Mark 7583 robo kitchen diner-bar and barbeque unit module, she had no idea it would rouse the jealousy of her antique Harry’s Bar unit. How could she? Robotics weren’t supposed to have emotions, no matter how realistic and devoted they seemed. Now she has to figure out how to escape the perfect prison her Harry’s Bar has created for her, all in the name of love.

 

Cry Unto Heaven
by Darwin A. Garrison
($0.99)

Her cry for help summoned him. Now he fights to save her and others like her from his own kind. Is he one of the fallen or is he much more?

 

Nocturnal Serenade
by Amanda S. Green
($4.99)

In this sequel to Nocturnal Origins, Lt. Mackenzie Santos of the Dallas Police Department learns there are worst things than finding out you come from a long line of shapeshifters. At least that’s what she keeps telling herself. It’s not that she resents suddenly discovering she can turn into a jaguar. Nor is it really the fact that no one warned her what might happen to her one day. Although, come to think of it, her mother does have a lot of explaining to do when – and if – Mac ever talks to her again. No, the real problem is how to keep the existence of shapeshifters hidden from the normals, especially when just one piece of forensic evidence in the hands of the wrong technician could lead to their discovery.

Add in blackmail, a long overdue talk with her grandmother about their heritage and an attack on her mother and Mac’s life is about to get a lot more complicated. What she wouldn’t give for a run-of-the-mill murder to investigate. THAT would be a nice change of pace.

 

Quick Change Artist
by C. S. Laurel
($0.99)

In this short story, Professor William Yates’ gets more than he bargains for when he wakes up with a snake tattoo, a pierced tongue and an even bigger surprise. It turns out a serial rapist who answers his description EXCEPT for having those, has kidnapped him and made him match. Bill and Brian interview “ink artists” and various one night stands to find him.

 

Quicksand
by C. S. Laurel
($4.99)

When a dying man rings his doorbell, secrets from Professor William Yates’ past rise up, which threaten his relationship with Brian Quick, his reputation and his life. Caught in the quicksand of his past, he has to solve the murder to get free.

This is the second book in the Quick Mysteries series. You can find B. Quick, the first book in the series, here.

 

The Poet Gnawreate and the Taxman
by Dave Freer
($0.99)

There are some things even more terrifying than a visit from the taxman. When the taxman runs afoul of a witch who really wants to be a successful poet – and who is willing to do anything to attain success – the taxman finds himself in serious need of a dentist. Of course, finding a dentist willing to do an extraction from the pages of a possessed book might prove more than a bit difficult.

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An update and a few thoughts

The good news first.  Our new storefront is up and functioning wonderfully.  Everyone at NRP has worked hard to make the change-over and to make sure all our customers still have access to the books and short stories they purchased through the old storefront.  If you haven’t received and e-mail from us saying either a new account has been created or giving you a coupon code for downloads, please let us know at info-at-nakedreader-dot-com (you know what to do to make it into a real email addy).

The second bit of good news is that we have three new titles up and more on the way.  Firefight by Thomas A. Easton is a digital reprint of the novel, the first time it has been available as an e-book.  Part techno-thriller and part sci-fi, it’s a fun and thought-provoking tale of what can happen if those who are worried about what humans are doing to our planet go too far.

Family Obligations by Stephen Simmons takes us on a quest for vengeance that isn’t quite what it seems.  Bump in the Night is a digital reprint of a short story I wrote that appeared in the anthology Better Off Undead. These titles are now available through our storefront and will soon be available through Amazon, Barnes & Noble and other e-stores.

As I said, we have other titles coming out this month as well.  Included is Quicksand by C. S. Laurel, the second book in the Quick Mysteries series.  The first book, B. Quick, is currently free not only on our site, but also on Amazon, iTunes and most other major outlets.  Other titles will include, among others, Cat’s Paw by Robert A. Hoyt and For Conspicuous Valor by Darwin A. Garrison.  So keep checking back for announcements about these titles and others.

Now for those few thoughts I threatened — er, promised.  Not too long ago I blogged about the need for authors to follow submission guidelines when sending something to anyone, be that person an agent or a publisher.  I know we’ve all heard the horror stories about some of the “interesting” submissions editors and agents received when all submissions had to be mailed in.  Back then, it wasn’t all that uncommon for submissions to come in brightly colored envelopes with things like “attacked by aliens”, “dictated by my dead grandmother” written on them.  The pages themselves might be bright pink if the submission was a romance novel or blood red, even black, if horror.  Fonts, omg, fonts were in all different shapes and sizes.  Glitter might fall out of the envelope as the editor pulled out the perfumed pages.  Is it any wonder most publishers and agents have gone to electronic submissions?

Yes, it is environmentally better to go the electronic route.  It’s also easier and cheaper for all involved.  But — and this is a big BUT — that doesn’t mean guidelines are only to be looked at and then the author gets to decide if he is going to follow them.

Look, guidelines are there for a reason.  They are to make it as easy as possible for the agent or editor to read the story.  You want them to focus on content, not on format.  That won’t happen if you submit your novel or short story in something that isn’t what they ask for.  Their first impression is not going to be a good one.  I promise you, the first thought they’ll have isn’t “Wow, what a great idea!”  It’s going to be, “Well, here’s another one who couldn’t be bothered to read the guidelines.”  Is that the way you want to start out what you hope will be a profitable relationship for all involved?

A couple of commenters on the original post pointed out that they don’t write in standard manuscript format.  They change it after they finish and are ready to submit.  I have absolutely no problem with that because, depending on what machine I’m using at the time — I write on a laptop, a desktop, a netbook and a tablet depending on the when and where I’m writing — neither do I.  But, like those commenters, I make sure I have the piece formatted in the way requested by the publisher before sending it off.

Someone else made the point that we, as agents and editors, ought to be glad when we get a submission by an author who uses different formats because it means they are more apt to find mistakes before sending it off and, by inference, that we’d see more mistakes upon first reading.  Yep, you guessed it, my head sort of exploded then.  The first time an editor or agent reads a submission, it isn’t to see how many mistakes are present.  We aren’t editing then.  We are interested solely in determining if the submission is something we want to represent or publish.  Nothing more and nothing less.  When we see a submission where it is obvious the author didn’t try to meet our guidelines, we have to ask if this is an author we want to work with.  If they can’t be concerned to do as we ask before we have a working relationship, does this bode well for what will happen after there is such a relationship?  Will it be worth the potential headaches?

So, do yourself a favor.  Read the guidelines.  Do your best to follow them.  Believe it or not, there are some agents and editors — not us — who use software that will toss out your submissions if you don’t follow those guidelines.  That includes making sure you include the appropriate information in the subject line of your email and the information you include in the body of the email.  Don’t start off with one or two strikes against you before the editor has read the first page of your submission.

 

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Without a Trace

Just a quick announcement to let you know that Dave Freer’s  novella, Without a Trace ($2.99) is now available for purchase.  It will also be available later this week from Amazon, Barnes & Noble and Smashwords.  As with all our titles, there is NO DRM added.

In Without a Trace, Dave brings us the exciting new middle grade/early YA fantasy-adventure story of young Mike O’Hara and his quest to find out what happened to his grandfather.

*     *     *

Mike O’Hara has spent his life defending the family honor. His grandfather, Cap’n Al O’Hara, has been called everything from smuggler to coward and it is said he abandoned his family rather than pay his debts. Mike knows better, but what’s a boy to do?

When his father is injured in an automobile accident and the authorities threaten to take Mike from the family farm, Mike knows he has to do something. Spurred on by a radio transmission that just might be from Cap’n Al, Mike and his best friend, Amos, start out on a mission to find his grandfather. His journey takes him to an alternate South Africa inhabited by pirates and worse. Mike quickly finds himself in a race against time to rescue his grandfather and return home – before it’s too late.

 *     *     *

You’ve heard of the Bermuda triangle? You know, where compasses suddenly start to spin wildly, with a sudden darkness at noon, where ships and planes sometimes just disappear. When they’re gone, they’re just… gone, and nothing ever comes back. There are other places where this is supposed to happen too. There’s a spot deep in the Gobi, and another above the Java Trench. And then… there’s the Wild Coast…. some very strange things have happened there. Over the years Portuguese Carracks, British East Indiamen, and, in 1908, the Wahratah have disappeared off that coast.

On the 27th of July in 1981 my granddad flew his Piper Cherokee out from the little bumpy airstrip on our farm, in the direction of Port St. Johns. He flew off to go and take a swarm of bees out of a friend’s holiday cottage. He flew out of our lives, and for all anyone knew out of this world. He and his plane were “missing”. They’d just disappeared, disappeared without a trace. No wreckage was ever found.

Then the problems started.

For starters he was in trouble with the security police. Politics, guns. They reckoned Granddad was a gun-runner. My old man says it was quite possible. He says his dad was up to anything, provided it was totally lunatic. Everyone had thought he was a rich man, but it seemed he owed a lot of money. There was very little money in his bank account.

Then the story came out. He’d drawn out twenty thousand Rand the day before he flew, and bought Krugerrands with it. He’d been buying gold for years, it seemed. Suddenly, nobody believed he’d crashed anymore. Everyone said he’d cut and run. Everyone but my dad.

“My father never ran away from anything in his life!” That’s what he said to the papers then. That’s what he said to me maybe a thousand times since. My dad was twenty three then, not even married a year, and still having a grand old time at University. Me, I was three months old.

Suddenly he wasn’t a rich man’s son anymore. Suddenly he didn’t have any friends. Three days later he didn’t have a wife either. She left him with a baby boy, a stack of debts and no future.

He’d lost everything but the farm. Fortunately, my grandmother had left that to Dad. Granddad couldn’t be proved to be dead, so my father never got to see Granddad’s will. Granddad was well insured, but Dad couldn’t claim anything because Granddad wasn’t legally dead. The plane was insured too, but it was just “missing”.

*   *   *   *

Click here to see what Shiny Book Reviews had to say about Without a Trace.

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Hear ye! Hear ye!

As promised, I’m back with a couple of announcements and other news.

I want to start by assuring those of you who have been waiting impatiently for Impaler to come out in print, that your wait will soon be over.  Barring unforeseen problems, it will be available for purchase the beginning of next month.  We’ll post updates as the time gets closer.

This next bit of news is more personal to me.  I found out the end of last week that the bosses have given the green light, provisionally, for the sequel to Nocturnal Origins.  What that means is they want to bring it out and the numbers are looking good.  However, for me to write the book and have it done in time for it to come out when they want, I’m going to have to take time off from NRP.  So, it would really be nice for my numbers to increase — while the image of the starving artist or writer is one we’re all familiar with, I like my Blue Bell ice cream and starving really isn’t something I want to do 😉  That means, I need your help.  Tell your family and friends about Origins, if you liked it.  As I’ve said before, you guys are our greatest promotional tool and we do appreciate all you do to spread the word.

Here is the tentative schedule for the rest of the year.  I say tentative because there may be some shuffling of titles.  There will also be some short stories and at least one more novel added to the list.  However, just to give you an idea of what is coming, here you go:

May

  • Here There Be Faeries (fantasy short story) by Stephen Simmons
  • Without a Trace (fantasy middle grade novella) by Dave Freer
  • Revocare (fantasy short story) by Leslie Fish
  • Lawyers of Mars (science fiction novella) by Pam Uphoff
  • The Flight of the Phoenix (fantasy novella) by Chris McMahon

June 6th

  • Blood Price (urban fantasy short story collection) by Sarah A. Hoyt

June 20th

  • A Deeper Silence (sf/f short story collection) by Charles Edgar Quinn
  • The Calvanni (fantasy novel) by Chris McMahon

July 4th

  • Blackie (Pony Express short story) by James Snover
  • Vengeance Mine (mystery novel) by Jenny Schall
  • Short story collection — author to be announced shortly

August 8th

  • Firefight (novel) by Thomas Easton
  • Quicksand (mystery novel) by C. S. Laurel

August 22nd

  • Cat’s Paw (fantasy novel) by Robert A. Hoyt

September 5th

  • The South Shall Rise Again (romantic suspense novel with a touch of supernatural) by Ellie Ferguson

September 19th

  • A Flaw in Her Magic (urban fantasy adaptation of Mansfield Park) by Sarah A. Hoyt
  • Short story, title to be determined, by Taylor M. Lunsford

Otober 3rd

  • Five from the Past (short story collection) by Sarah A. Hoyt
  • Halloween themed short stories

October 31st

  • Halloween short story collection
  • Nocturnal Serenade (urban fantasy novel) by Amanda S. Green

November 21st

  • Holiday Collection by Robert A. Hoyt

December 5th

  • Scytheman (fantasy novel) by Chris McMahon

December 19th

  • ConVent (urban fantasy) by Kate Paulk

As noted above, we will be adding short stories to this schedule as well as at least one or two more novels.  Check back over the next few weeks for blurbs and more information about these titles.

–Amanda

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Submission Period Opens Soon

Well, folks, it’s almost that time again.  Starting April 1st and running the entire month, we’ll be accepting submissions for short stories and novels.  Our previous submission periods have brought us some wonderful stories.  The first of these will appear next month — Want by Jay Caselberg and Skipping Stones by Darwin Garrison.

You can find out submission guidelines here.

Like most publishers, big and small, our editors have a wide variety of interests.  So, if you have a mystery, romance, fantasy, space opera, alternate history or anything else that isn’t specifically prohibited by the guidelines, send it in.  We’d love to see it.

Until later!

–Amanda

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March Update

The problem with running a small press is that, well, there aren’t a lot of people involved in the operation.  That means when one — or in our case several — of us get sick or have real life intrude, things slow down.  That’s what happened this month.  But have no fear.  We will get the rest of the schedule out.  Impaler by Kate Paulk and Blood Reunion, a short story collection by Sarah A. Hoyt, will be out next week.  Without a Trace by Dave Freer, which is currently available here as an E-ARC, will be out the following week.  In the meantime, check out Death of a Musketeer by Sarah D’Almeida and Nocturnal Origins by Amanda S. Green.

In the meantime, I’m going to cut back blogging to three times a week.  Of course, if something happens that I think we need to talk about, I’ll pop up long enough to post it.  Our next blog will be Friday.

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Two Titles Discounted

For a short time, two of our titles are being discounted.  The first is Knights in Tarnished Armor by Kate Paulk.  The second is B. Quick by C. S. Laurel.  Snippets below.

* * *

Knights in Tarnished Armor ($1.99) is a comedy of errors, er, letters. . . .

1. Letter to Sir Richard Amesbury, from Sir Anthony Grimston

My dear friend,

It should come as no surprise to you that the kingdom in an intolerable state. In all my years as a professional scoundrel and despoiler of maidens, I have never seen anything to equal this. I simply cannot do business.

The dearth of maidens is appalling, Richard, utterly appalling. How can I abduct a woman and threaten her with a Fate Worse Than Death if such a fate as already befallen her – and worse, she enjoyed it!

Worse, no self-respecting Knight in Shining Armor will rescue a besmirched maiden. I do not even get the somewhat dubious pleasure of besmirching them myself. They come to me pre-besmirched, as it were. My dragon is starving, and my estate is on the brink of bankruptcy.

Can you see any solution to this problem?

Your friend,
Anthony

2. Letter to Sir Anthony Grimston, from Sir Richard Amesbury

Dear Anthony,

It grieves me to say this, but things are no better on this side of the heroic fence. I have twenty strapping young Knights in Slightly Less Than Shining Armor, and every last one seems to be so busy despoiling the kingdom maidens he has a hard time keeping his lance straight, if you take my meaning.

I would offer to send you one for your dragon, but I fear none of them are virgin either. I fear a Fate Worse Than Death is entirely too pleasurable for our kingdom’s former maidens.

With regret,
Richard.

* * *

B. Quick ($2.99) is a fun mystery that begins on the night of triumphal activity for the Society For The Elimination of Good Looking Blonds. At least that’s how it seems when literature professor Bill Yates interrupts a murder.

Ooh, Ooh, Ooh, What a Little Moonlight Can Do to You

Fall had been warm and rainy. The first snow of the year arrived in the Colorado Rockies late on Halloween night. To make up for its late arrival, it rushed in, eager and heavy, trying to make an unforgettable impression.

It caught me halfway between Cowpattie and Lythia Springs, driving my MG unsteadily along a rutted and narrow country road hemmed in by tall cliffs on either side.

One moment, all was clear under a moonlit sky and my only problem was the sign I’d just glimpsed, which warned DANGER: Rock Slides Next Five Miles. The next minute, the moon had vanished, curtains of snow fell all around, and I had to worry about causing a rockslide by crashing against the roadside cliffs.

Everything a palm or so beyond my windshield disappeared beneath snow. And the bourbon I’d drunk at the Halloween party at Bad Boys kept blurring my focus and giving me a suggestion of pink elephants in tutus and high heels can-can dancing at the edge of my vision.

The curls of my black wig brushed against the stiff expanse of my Elizabethan collar.

Three months short of my thirtieth birthday, a staid college professor in a little Colorado town, I had no business being out in weather like this, wearing a Shakespeare costume and a bit more than half-drunk.

But I didn’t have much choice. My hometown of Lythia Springs was three hours away from Bad Boys.

Well, an hour by highway or as the crow flew — three hours by backcountry roads as the closeted professor drove.

Bad Boys had thrown a Halloween party for its patrons. And the blond I was supposed to meet at Bad Boys had told me that I would look ravishing dressed as Shakespeare. My eyes — so I was told  — burned with the same intensity and inspiration as in the portraits of the bard.

Then, predictably, I’d been stood up and left to get drunk on my own. You’d think I’d know my luck by now. . . .

 

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