Category Archives: announcement

A few thoughts from Charles Martin

The e-book revolution, so far, has largely been in fiction, but there are many people who like nonfiction, read nonfiction, and buy nonfiction. Our new line of non-fiction, is intended for the same audience that reads science fiction: literate — but not necessarily literary, not afraid of big concepts, at home with the idea that there is a reality that can be described and understood.

The ideal Naked Reader Press non-fiction book is, first of all, well-written, interesting, and fun to read.  It can be serious or light, but it must be based on facts, verifiable facts, with enough support to allow facts to be checked, quotes to be verified, and arguments that even someone completely new to the topic can follow.

Some examples of books like what we’d like to see:

Advertisements

Leave a comment

Filed under announcement

We’re baaaaack!

I know it’s been a long time since I posted anything here and I apologize. It hasn’t been because there was nothing going on at NRP. Quite the contrary, in fact. There was a great deal going on behind the scenes, things we wanted to talk about but figured it best until everything was in place. Well, it is now and you’ll find that we will be blogging much more often — about what’s going on at NRP, in the publishing industry as a whole and on other topics of interest. So please check back often.

Now, to our news. The NRP family has expanded. We have a new acquisitions editor as well as new editors for our romance/suspense line and our new non-fiction line. So, without further ado, I’ll make the introductions.

First up is our acquisitions editor. Courtney Galloway has been assisting with our slush submissions since the beginning of NRP. She has a keen eye for new authors and for spotting stories that will do well. She will now be wrangling the slush for us and joining the editorial board.

T. M. Lunsford has stepped in as assistant editor for romance/suspense. Taylor is a talented author in her own right and has shown a flair for editing. We’re excited to welcome her to our editorial staff and she’s promised to hit the ground running. You’ll be hearing from her in tomorrow’s blog about her background and what she’s looking for in submissions.

Charles Martin is our new assistant editor for non-fiction.Many of you know Charlie from his work as a journalist and contributor over at PJ Media. We’re thrilled to have him onboard and he promises to have a blog post for you very soon describing what he’s looking for.

The last new member — although she really isn’t — to our family is Sarah A. Hoyt. Sarah was one of the first authors to be published by NRP and she has, for some months now, acted as our art director. She has now accepted the position and I’m thrilled. Her understanding of what it takes to have a successful e-book cover is invaluable.

Finally, for those of you who have been asking, Kate Paulk’s novel, ConSensual, will be released Wednesday of this week. Here is a short sample as well as a look at the cover. Enjoy!

1. ConSensual Encounters

Nothing says you’ve left normal reality like walking into a hotel lobby and seeing a Clone Trooper chatting with a Sith Lord. The sign on the back of the Clone Trooper’s armor, ‘Come to the Dark Side. We have cookies. Tonight. Room 1226’, was really just corroborating evidence.

The lure of Dark Side cookies notwithstanding, I took myself to the reception desk and got signed in. I’ll give them this: the staff didn’t seem at all upset by the strangeness manifesting in their hotel. Maybe it’s a southern USA thing, but none of the southern con hotels I’ve been in have ever been anything less than welcoming.

Well, unless the convention was sharing space with one of the more fundamentalist religious conventions. But that’s another story altogether.

ConSensual being one of the bigger southern conventions, I doubted that would be an issue. It was held in one of those sprawling southern cities that takes about five times the land area of a northern city to hold the same population, and usually has so many hotels it’s not hard for any one event to make an exclusive booking.

Whatever they do with them outside the convention season isn’t my business.

I can never keep the hotels straight. This one was one of those modernist faux-elegant jobs with lots of shiny metal and glass, a multi-level gallery area where all the ballrooms and convention areas were, the inevitable bar and house of bad coffee, and the tower containing the actual rooms off to one side.

Since it sat in the middle of one of the less salubrious parts of the city — or at least it looked that way coming in on the airport shuttle — I expected there would be some interesting late night encounters.

I dropped my backpack off in my room: as always, several levels away from the party floor. I’d been able to book the northern side of the hotel this time. After the last con, where a murderous lunatic had crushed garlic into the air vent and opened the curtains while I slept, I was a little paranoid about sunlight and other things.

Yeah, I’m a vampire. I drink blood. Most of the rest is myth, but I am violently allergic to garlic, and while I’m old enough to go walking in the sun that doesn’t mean I like it.

I’d also taken the precaution of registering and signing for my room with one of my alternate identities. I keep a few for backup, in case something happens. Last con, it had, with a vengeance. You don’t get more something than a nutcase performing ritual sacrifices so they can summon Himself Below.

Anyone looking for my hotel room using the name I was registered in with that con would find precisely nothing.

My room was decorated in modernist Hotel Awful, complete with the kind of paintings on the walls that made you wonder who was having who on. This set looked like someone had splattered paint around, ridden a bike through it, then cut up the canvas and sold the results. A similar pattern adorned the bedspread and the upholstery on the chairs. At least everything else was basic beige.

One thing I’d learned from years going to cons, it was always possible to get more mind-bogglingly tasteless.

Back in the lobby area, I braved the con registration queue to collect my badge and the little plastic bag with the program and half a dozen flyers, then scanned the area to see if any of the immortal regulars had arrived yet.

The usual mix of convention exotica mingled and chatted, some costumed, some not. The inevitable Klingons clustered with Clone Troops and Imperial Stormtroopers — possibly giving tips on how to hit the side of a barn at point blank range. A woman in what could only be described as Regency in Space chatted with a White Witch whose pointy hat was at least as tall as she was. The construction had to be reinforced with wire because there was no other way it could have stayed upright. The thing probably made a functional antenna, and with the way the wide brim drooped to cover her ears I gave it maybe half an hour before people were speculating it was an alien mind control device. I knew she was a white witch because her hat and dress were white. She even had a white wand, although thankfully it didn’t have a star on the end. That would have been too much.

This being the south, there were any number of corseted women, although all of them seemed to have forgotten that the usual location of a corset is under the clothing. The inevitable uplift certainly distracted the fanboys. Precisely why the corsets should be paired with tied on wings that could be either butterfly or fairy wings depending on your viewpoint wasn’t something I intended to investigate. Some things are best left to the imagination. Or preferably, forgotten altogether.

At least there were no chain mail bikinis yet. Hopefully with the hotel air conditioning set to the typically southern preference of ‘glacial’, there wouldn’t be any. Not that I was holding my breath or anything.

Well, not until I saw who was sitting out front, eying the con-goers with the kind of disapproval that should have had them dropping dead of sheer fright.

He wasn’t here for the con. I’d bet my life on that. I might never have met him, but everything I’d heard about him suggested that he’d find fen irritating at best, and most of the authors offensive. What he’d think about the publishers — particularly the demonic ones — didn’t bear scrutiny.

I hoped I was wrong, and he was just some random businessman who happened to have a rather strong resemblance to one Vlad Tepes, also known as Dracula. The closer I got to him, the less likely that seemed.

For starters, he was definitely a vampire. I can pick most immortals by scent: it takes a vampire older and stronger than me to mask the faint cold smell of my kind, and then… well, nothing smells of nothing at all. No scent meant old, powerful, and probably not with good intentions.

He was also the right age — five hundred years, give or take a few. Him being awake in the middle of the day meant only that he’d grown strong enough to tolerate daylight and lose the sense of time that protects younger, weaker vampires. For a vampire his age to tolerate daylight, he had to be stronger than most, which fitted with the bits and pieces known about the man. If this truly was Dracula, the likelihood of him limiting himself was somewhere close to the chances of the sun rising in the west.

I could reasonably assume that he had given up his favorite means of execution: this wasn’t an era when putting people on sticks and letting them die slowly was something that could be done discreetly. That didn’t mean he hadn’t found other ways of torturing people who got in his way.

All of which meant that since I was the only immortal regular around, I had to warn him off. Joyous.

At least this didn’t count as saving the world. Once was enough for that.

Leave a comment

Filed under announcement, Snippet

New Titles

It’s been awhile, and I apologize. But it seems like everyone here has been felled by the crud that won’t leave, family emergencies and Murphy. You know Murphy. He shows up when you least have time to deal with him and stays much too long. Any way, we’ve kicked Murphy out and are now back to the grindstone. To get things underway for 2012, we’re pleased to offer six new titles.

Boys

by Dave Freer
($0.99)

When she was “convinced” to buy the new Mark 7583 robo kitchen diner-bar and barbeque unit module, she had no idea it would rouse the jealousy of her antique Harry’s Bar unit. How could she? Robotics weren’t supposed to have emotions, no matter how realistic and devoted they seemed. Now she has to figure out how to escape the perfect prison her Harry’s Bar has created for her, all in the name of love.

 

Cry Unto Heaven
by Darwin A. Garrison
($0.99)

Her cry for help summoned him. Now he fights to save her and others like her from his own kind. Is he one of the fallen or is he much more?

 

Nocturnal Serenade
by Amanda S. Green
($4.99)

In this sequel to Nocturnal Origins, Lt. Mackenzie Santos of the Dallas Police Department learns there are worst things than finding out you come from a long line of shapeshifters. At least that’s what she keeps telling herself. It’s not that she resents suddenly discovering she can turn into a jaguar. Nor is it really the fact that no one warned her what might happen to her one day. Although, come to think of it, her mother does have a lot of explaining to do when – and if – Mac ever talks to her again. No, the real problem is how to keep the existence of shapeshifters hidden from the normals, especially when just one piece of forensic evidence in the hands of the wrong technician could lead to their discovery.

Add in blackmail, a long overdue talk with her grandmother about their heritage and an attack on her mother and Mac’s life is about to get a lot more complicated. What she wouldn’t give for a run-of-the-mill murder to investigate. THAT would be a nice change of pace.

 

Quick Change Artist
by C. S. Laurel
($0.99)

In this short story, Professor William Yates’ gets more than he bargains for when he wakes up with a snake tattoo, a pierced tongue and an even bigger surprise. It turns out a serial rapist who answers his description EXCEPT for having those, has kidnapped him and made him match. Bill and Brian interview “ink artists” and various one night stands to find him.

 

Quicksand
by C. S. Laurel
($4.99)

When a dying man rings his doorbell, secrets from Professor William Yates’ past rise up, which threaten his relationship with Brian Quick, his reputation and his life. Caught in the quicksand of his past, he has to solve the murder to get free.

This is the second book in the Quick Mysteries series. You can find B. Quick, the first book in the series, here.

 

The Poet Gnawreate and the Taxman
by Dave Freer
($0.99)

There are some things even more terrifying than a visit from the taxman. When the taxman runs afoul of a witch who really wants to be a successful poet – and who is willing to do anything to attain success – the taxman finds himself in serious need of a dentist. Of course, finding a dentist willing to do an extraction from the pages of a possessed book might prove more than a bit difficult.

2 Comments

Filed under announcement

New Titles & Upcoming Schedule

Just a quick announcement to let you know we have some new titles available for purchase from our webstore as well as from Amazon.  They will also be available shortly from Barnes & Noble and other e-book outlets.

Cat’s Paw

by Robert A. Hoyt

($4.99)

The Mountain at The End Of The World upon which a bird sharpens its beak is down to where one more beak-wipe will eliminate it, and thus bring about the end of the universe. The only ones who can save us are… a bunch of stray cats.

This isn’t your children’s bedtime story.  It has been described as “Watership Down meets the Terminato”r as well as “Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy — on acid”.  Check it out!

 

Be Careful What You Ask For

by Amanda S. Green

($0.99)

All she’d ever wanted was to get out of the dead end town she’d lived in all her life.  Well, that and find a job that wasn’t as much of a dead end as the town.  Perhaps even find someone to share her life with.  Then Alexander Reed  walked back into her life just as suddenly as he’d walked out years before.  There’d been a time when she’d have done almost anything to be with him.  Now he offered her the chance to do exactly what she’d been wishing all her life.  But at what cost?

 

For Conspicuous Valor

by Darwin A. Garrison

($0.99)

In Conspicuous Valor. Darwin A. Garrison gives us a wonderful science fiction short story with a believable main character who would rather be doing anything but playing with her younger sister. Until, that is, her daydreaming results in danger for her baby brother and a well-deserved dressing down by her uncle. In an attempt to prove herself, she sneaks out the next morning, only to find herself hip-deep in trouble she’d never expected and having to find a way out to save not only herself but her family as well. Whether she has the strength and determination to do it is a question she has to answer — and she’s not sure she can.

 

In the Absence of Light

by Sarah A. Hoyt

($0.99)

In this short story, Sarah A. Hoyt takes us to a time when space travel has many of the same sort of tales that sea travel did several centuries ago. So these monsters really exist or are they just the figments of overly active imaginations? The crew and passengers of the the Amadryad will all too soon learn the answer to what happened to those who’d traveled on the the Tenebras, the first colony ship to Tau Centauri as well as learning if the drifters are real or nothing more than tales meant to frighten people so they don’t look too closely at what is really happening.

 

Night Shifted

by Kate Paulk

($0.99)

The unexpected is commonplace when you work the night shift at the local convenience store. But even that doesn’t prepare you for the Buffy-wanna be who walks through the door and all the trouble she brings with her.

 

The Blood Like Wine

by Sarah A. Hoyt

($0.99)

In the French revolution rivers of blood flowed. From the blood evil arose. Ancient evil engulfed Sylvie. Now in a twentieth century of fast cars and faster living, she must try to expiate evil and recapture her lost love.

 

Here is a list of our upcoming novels.  We will also be publishing at least two short stories a month.  So check our website often for new titles.

November 2011

 ConVent
Kate Paulk

ConVent is proof that Kate Paulk’s brain works in wonderfully mysterious ways.  If there is a plot further from her novel Impaler, I can’t think of it.  When I asked Kate last night to give me a quick synopsis of ConVent, she emailed this:  A sarcastic vampire, his werewolf best buddy, an undercover angel and his succubus squeeze. The “Save the world” department really messed it up this time. Just so you know, that pretty much sums up the book which is one of the most fun reads I’ve had in a very long time.

 

Quick Sand
C. S. Laurel

When a dying man rings his doorbell, secrets from Professor William Yates’ past rise up, which threaten his relationship with Brian Quick, his reputation and his life.  Caught in the quicksand of his past, he has to solve the murder to get free.

 

Quick Change Artist
C. S. Laurel

In this story, Professor William Yates’ gets more than he bargains for when he wakes up with a snake tattoo, a pierced tongue and an even bigger surprise. It turns out a serial rapist who answers his description EXCEPT for having those, has kidnapped him and made him match. Bill and Brian interview “ink artists” and various one night stands to find him.

 

December 2011

A Flaw in Her Magic
Sarah A. Hoyt

In A Flaw of Her Magic, Sarah A. Hoyt gives us her take on Jane Austen’s Mansfield Park. This time, Austen’s England is populated with weredragons, werewolves and magic.

 

Nocturnal Serenade
Amanda S. Green

In this sequel to Nocturnal Origins, Lt. Mackenzie Santos of the Dallas Police Department learns there are worst things than finding out you come from a long line of shapeshifters. At least that’s what she keeps telling herself. It’s not that she resents suddenly discovering she can turn into a jaguar. Nor is it really the fact that no one warned her what might happen to her one day. Although, come to think of it, her mother does have a lot of explaining to do when – and if – Mac ever talks to her again. No, the real problem is how to keep the existence of shapeshifters hidden from the normals, especially when just one piece of forensic evidence in the hands of the wrong technician could lead to their discovery.

Add in blackmail, a long overdue talk with her grandmother about their heritage and an attack on her mother and Mac’s life is about to get a lot more complicated. What she wouldn’t give for a run-of-the-mill murder to investigate. THAT would be a nice change of pace.

 

January 2012

Scytheman
Chris McMahon

Book 2 of the Jakirian Cycle, Chris’s wonderful fantasy, begun in The Calvanni.

 

Demise of Faith
Ellie Ferguson

Murder and dirty cops make for a very bad week for Liza Ashe as she tries to learn the truth about her father’s death.

 

February 2012

A Deadly Paws
Elise Hyatt

This is the first of the Orphan Kitten Mysteries by Hyatt.

A litter of kittens in a bag getting dropped on the lawn of any family can be expected to create some stir.  But when the litter is dropped on the devil strip of the Goldport, Colorado,home of a creatively eccentric family, what ensues is a murder investigation, a fun romp, and a new all absorbing passion for kitten rescue.

 

Skeletons in the Closet
Ellie Ferguson

Every family has its skeletons they’d prefer stayed hidden in that proverbial closet. That’s especially true when it comes to Lexie Smithson’s family. The only problem is, her family’s skeletons are all too real and they refuse to stay in the closet. It not only plays hell with her home life, but what’s a girl to do for a love life when those old bones start rattling and demanding attention?

 

March 2012

Sword of Arelion
J. T. Schall

Book 1 of a new fantasy series.

 

Hell Bound
Sarah A. Hoyt

Since Claudia Neri’s fiancé died under mysterious circumstances, she’s not been herself.  So when she starts seeing his ghost and getting signs he’s still around, she thinks she’s going insane.  The truth turns out to be far more distressing and will include and archangel, several ancient gods and blood sacrifice.

 

April 2012

Rye Crisp
Sarah A. Hoyt and Amanda S. Green

Alicia Rye learned long ago that life was never as simple or “normal” as those shows you see on TV. Divorced – and boy had her ego taken a beating over that. Not because she was divorced. No, because she’d been a fool to marry Howard for so many reasons – working to provide for herself and her cat, she finds her life once more intersecting that of her ex-husband as she investigates why his boss suddenly lit up like a Roman candle. As if that’s not enough, she has to deal with other, inherited troubles of the sort “normal” folks didn’t worry with – like the Vane, a ghost who has decided she’s his new best friend and who refuses to move on to the afterlife and a fire elemental that really wants to burn her bridges while she’s on them.

 

Musketeer’s Confessor
Sarah D’Almeida

Book 6 of the Musketeer’s Mystery series.

 

8 Comments

Filed under announcement, schedule

New Titles Now Available

 

I love it when things work quicker than I planned.  We have three new short stories available today on Amazon and soon to be available from Barnes & Noble as well as our own webstore.  I’ll be honest, we figured it would take the other outlets until tomorrow to take the stories live, so they weren’t going up at Naked Reader until tomorrow…well, that’s changing and as soon as the tech guy has his coffee, he’ll be putting them up later this morning.  Any way, enough rambling.  Here are the new short stories and a list of other titles to expect in the next week.

Be Careful What You Wish For

by Amanda S. Green

($0.99)

All she’d ever wanted was to get out of the dead end town she’d lived in all her life. Well, that and find a job that wasn’t as much of a dead end as the town. Perhaps even find someone to share her life with. Then Alexander Reed walked back into her life just as suddenly as he’d walked out years before. There’d been a time when she’d have done almost anything to be with him. Now he offered her the chance to do exactly what she’d been wishing all her life. But at what cost?

The Blood Like Wine

by Sarah A. Hoyt

($0.99)

In the French revolution rivers of blood flowed. From the blood evil arose. Ancient evil engulfed Sylvie. Now in a twentieth century of fast cars and faster living, she must try to expiate evil and recapture her lost love.

Night Shifted

by Kate Paulk

($0.99)

The unexpected is commonplace when you work the night shift at the local convenience store. But even that doesn’t prepare you for the Buffy-wanna be who walks through the door and all the trouble she brings with her.

Coming later this next week are several more wonderful titles:

Cat’s Paw

by Robert A. Hoyt

Described as “Watership Down meets the Terminator” and the “Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy — on acid”, this is by no means a children’s book.  Written by Robert when he was just 13 (and even then more mature than I’ll ever be), Cat’s Paw is one of those books you’ll laugh at even as you’re scratching your head and going back to see if you really did read what you think you just did.  You can find a snippet from it here.

For Conspicuous Valor

by Darwin Garrison

For Conspicuous Valor is a wonderful science fiction short story by Darwin.  He gives us a believable main character who would rather be doing anything but playing with her younger sister.  Until, that is, her daydreaming results in danger for her baby brother and a well-deserved dressing down by her uncle.  In an attempt to prove herself, she sneaks out the next morning, only to find herself hip-deep in trouble she’d never expected and having to find a way out to save not only herself but her family as well.  Whether she has the strength and determination to do it is a question she has to answer — and she’s not sure she can.

Absence of Light

by Sarah A. Hoyt

In this short story, Sarah takes us to a time when space travel has many of the same sort of tales that sea travel did several centuries ago.  So these monsters really exist or are they just the figments of overly active imaginations?  The crew and passengers of the the Amadryad will all too soon learn the answer to what happened to those who’d traveled on the the Tenebras, the first colony ship to Tau Centauri as well as learning if the drifters are real or nothing more than tales meant to frighten people so they don’t look too closely at what is really happening.

Check back next week for more news about our upcoming titles, including ConVent by Kate Paulk, a series of short stories by Dave Freer and much, much more.

Leave a comment

Filed under announcement, schedule

An update and a few thoughts

The good news first.  Our new storefront is up and functioning wonderfully.  Everyone at NRP has worked hard to make the change-over and to make sure all our customers still have access to the books and short stories they purchased through the old storefront.  If you haven’t received and e-mail from us saying either a new account has been created or giving you a coupon code for downloads, please let us know at info-at-nakedreader-dot-com (you know what to do to make it into a real email addy).

The second bit of good news is that we have three new titles up and more on the way.  Firefight by Thomas A. Easton is a digital reprint of the novel, the first time it has been available as an e-book.  Part techno-thriller and part sci-fi, it’s a fun and thought-provoking tale of what can happen if those who are worried about what humans are doing to our planet go too far.

Family Obligations by Stephen Simmons takes us on a quest for vengeance that isn’t quite what it seems.  Bump in the Night is a digital reprint of a short story I wrote that appeared in the anthology Better Off Undead. These titles are now available through our storefront and will soon be available through Amazon, Barnes & Noble and other e-stores.

As I said, we have other titles coming out this month as well.  Included is Quicksand by C. S. Laurel, the second book in the Quick Mysteries series.  The first book, B. Quick, is currently free not only on our site, but also on Amazon, iTunes and most other major outlets.  Other titles will include, among others, Cat’s Paw by Robert A. Hoyt and For Conspicuous Valor by Darwin A. Garrison.  So keep checking back for announcements about these titles and others.

Now for those few thoughts I threatened — er, promised.  Not too long ago I blogged about the need for authors to follow submission guidelines when sending something to anyone, be that person an agent or a publisher.  I know we’ve all heard the horror stories about some of the “interesting” submissions editors and agents received when all submissions had to be mailed in.  Back then, it wasn’t all that uncommon for submissions to come in brightly colored envelopes with things like “attacked by aliens”, “dictated by my dead grandmother” written on them.  The pages themselves might be bright pink if the submission was a romance novel or blood red, even black, if horror.  Fonts, omg, fonts were in all different shapes and sizes.  Glitter might fall out of the envelope as the editor pulled out the perfumed pages.  Is it any wonder most publishers and agents have gone to electronic submissions?

Yes, it is environmentally better to go the electronic route.  It’s also easier and cheaper for all involved.  But — and this is a big BUT — that doesn’t mean guidelines are only to be looked at and then the author gets to decide if he is going to follow them.

Look, guidelines are there for a reason.  They are to make it as easy as possible for the agent or editor to read the story.  You want them to focus on content, not on format.  That won’t happen if you submit your novel or short story in something that isn’t what they ask for.  Their first impression is not going to be a good one.  I promise you, the first thought they’ll have isn’t “Wow, what a great idea!”  It’s going to be, “Well, here’s another one who couldn’t be bothered to read the guidelines.”  Is that the way you want to start out what you hope will be a profitable relationship for all involved?

A couple of commenters on the original post pointed out that they don’t write in standard manuscript format.  They change it after they finish and are ready to submit.  I have absolutely no problem with that because, depending on what machine I’m using at the time — I write on a laptop, a desktop, a netbook and a tablet depending on the when and where I’m writing — neither do I.  But, like those commenters, I make sure I have the piece formatted in the way requested by the publisher before sending it off.

Someone else made the point that we, as agents and editors, ought to be glad when we get a submission by an author who uses different formats because it means they are more apt to find mistakes before sending it off and, by inference, that we’d see more mistakes upon first reading.  Yep, you guessed it, my head sort of exploded then.  The first time an editor or agent reads a submission, it isn’t to see how many mistakes are present.  We aren’t editing then.  We are interested solely in determining if the submission is something we want to represent or publish.  Nothing more and nothing less.  When we see a submission where it is obvious the author didn’t try to meet our guidelines, we have to ask if this is an author we want to work with.  If they can’t be concerned to do as we ask before we have a working relationship, does this bode well for what will happen after there is such a relationship?  Will it be worth the potential headaches?

So, do yourself a favor.  Read the guidelines.  Do your best to follow them.  Believe it or not, there are some agents and editors — not us — who use software that will toss out your submissions if you don’t follow those guidelines.  That includes making sure you include the appropriate information in the subject line of your email and the information you include in the body of the email.  Don’t start off with one or two strikes against you before the editor has read the first page of your submission.

 

2 Comments

Filed under announcement, Musings

Wow, We’re Almost One Year Old!

Later this month, NRP will celebrate it’s first anniversary.  Well, to be honest, it will be our first anniversary of going live.  We’d been in the planning stage for much longer.  But we’re excited and we’re hoping you are as well.  To help celebrate our birthday, we’ll be giving you, our readers, gifts so keep checking back for more details.  For now, I can tell you that we’ll be giving away some of our titles as well as discounting others.  There may be a contest or two for free copies of upcoming titles or for red-shirting in others.  Check back later this week and next for all the details.

I’m also pleased to announce that we will be publishing 12 more short stories by the wonderful Dave Freer.  We’ll be bringing out two short stories a month, starting in September.  The first will appear the week of September 5th, so mark your calendars.

Our titles this month run the gamut from science fiction to mystery to fantasy to the wildly imaginative worlds that exist in Robert A. Hoyt’s brain.  We have the first digital edition of Firefight, a novel by Thomas Easton first published in 1993.  Quicksand is the second novel in the Quick mystery series by C. S. Laurel.  Family Obligations is a fantasy short story by Stephen Simmons.  Cat’s Paw by Robert A. Hoyt is as funny as it satiric in this tale of a reluctant hero’s attempt to save the world.

Look for all of these titles the middle of the month.

And don’t forget to check back to see what sorts of surprises we have in store for you to celebrate our first anniversary.

Leave a comment

Filed under announcement, schedule